Posts Tagged ‘Armstrong’

This Week in Little Bighorn History

William Millard Caldwell died on October 30, 1913, in Clearfield, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, and was buried in the Old Town Cemetery there on November 1, 1913. He was a Private with Company B who was on detached service at the time of the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

Anton Seibelder was born in Lichtenvoorde, Germany, on October 31, 1828. He was a Private in Company A who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

Boston Custer (left) was born on October 31, 1848, in New Rumley, Ohio. He was a civilian guide who was killed with his brothers George and Tom during the battle.

James Madison DeWolf (right) married Fannie J. Downing on October 31, 1871. He was the Acting Assistant Surgeon who was killed during the valley fight.

William Thomas Craycroft died on October 31, 1906, in Dallas, Texas, and was buried in West Hill Cemetery in Sherman, Grayson County, Texas. He was a First Lieutenant in Company B who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

William Friedrich Braendle, who was also known as Wilhelm Friedrich Braendle, William Brandle, and William Cummings, was born on November 1, 1955, in Wurtemburg, Germany. He was a Private in Company C who was not present at the battle due to detached service at the Yellowstone Depot.

James E. Moore died on November 1, 1894, in Union, South Carolina. He was the Farrier for Company B who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight.

Charles Camillus DeRudio (left) died on November 1, 1910, in Los Angeles, California, and was buried in the San Francisco National Cemetery. He was the First Lieutenant in Company E who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

William Kane died in Washington, D.C., on November 2, 1879, and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company C who was not present at the battle due to illness.

John E. Armstrong was born on November 4, 1836, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Joshua and Matilda Faunce Armstrong. He was a Private in Company A who was killed in the valley fight.


This Week in Little Bighorn History

Robert Jackson was born on August 27, 1856, at Fort Benton, Montana Territory. He was a Scout who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

John E. Armstrong married Martha Hancock on August 27, 1856. He was a Private in Company A who was killed in the valley fight.

Walter Scott Sterland died on August 27, 1922, in Bismarck, Burleigh County, North Dakota, and was buried in the Dickinson Cemetery in Dickinson, Stark County, North Dakota. He was a Private in Company M who was not present at the battle due to detached service at Yellowstone Depot.

Darwin E. Symms was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on August 28, 1851. He was a Private in Company I who was killed with Custer’s Column.

John McGlone died on August 28, 1920, in the Barnes Hospital in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Sergeant with Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

John Mullen died in San Francisco, California, on August 29, 1888, and was buried in the San Francisco National Cemetery at the Presidio. He was a Sergeant with Company L who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

Charles Sanders died on August 29, 1915, in Lincoln, Nebraska. He was a Private in Company D who served as an orderly for Lt. Edgerly during the battle and participated in the hilltop fight.

John Sivertsen died in Washington, D.C., on August 30, 1925, and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

Samuel B. Severs was born on August 31, 1854, in St. Louis, Missouri. He was a Private in Company H who was wounded during the hilltop fight.

Little Sioux died in North Dakota on August 31, 1933, and was buried in Saint Joseph’s Catholic Cemetery in Twin Buttes, North Dakota. He was a Scout who was with Reno’s Column during the valley fight.

Thomas J. Finnegan was born on September 1, 1950, in Hillsboro, Ohio. He was a Private in Company M who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Jacob Deihle died in Washington, D.C., on September 2, 1885, and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Sergeant with Company L who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

James P. Boyle died on September 2, 1920, in Bismarck, North Dakota, and was buried there on September 4 in St. Mary’s Cemetery. He was a Private in Company G who participated in the valley and hilltop fights, where he was wounded.


This Week in Little Bighorn History

William Braendle, of Hermann, Mo., was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, November 1, 1855. His father, Jacob Braendle, was a native of Germany, and came to the United States in 1870, locating first in Allegheny City, Penn., and after a residence there of seven months removed to Gasconade County, Mo. He located eight miles west of Hermann, where he died in 1872. After the father’s death William left the farm and went to St. Louis, where he labored by the day. He returned to Hermann in 1882, where in March of that year he married Elizabeth Trechnlann, daughter of John Trechmann (deceased). Mrs. Braendle was born in Hermann, and she and Mr. Braendle became the parents of three children, two of whom are living: John and Grover Cleveland. Mr. Braendle belongs to the I. O. O. F. in St. Louis, and the E. of P. in Hermann. He conducts a quiet and orderly beer and wine saloon, and is an honest citizen of the county.

This biography of William Braendle was published in 1888. According to Men with Custer, Braendle (also known as Wilhelm Friedrich Braendle, William Brandle, and William Cummings) resided in California for the last 30 years of his life and died there in 1932.

Other Little Bighorn milestones for November 1 include the deaths of James E. Moore in 1894 in Union, South Carolina, and Charles Camillus DeRudio in 1910 in Los Angeles, California. Other Seventh Cavalry anniversaries this week include: