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Posts Tagged ‘Calhoun’

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Frederick Smith died on August 18, 1905. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn due to detached service.

Jacob Huff died in Tilton, Illinois on August 18, 1929, and was buried in the North Grove Cemetery in Celina, Ohio. He was a Private in the band, which did not accompany the cavalry to the battle.

Thomas Sherborne died on August 19, 1910, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there under the name Thomas Shereborne. He was a Private in the band, which did not accompany the cavalry to the battle.

Black Elk (left) died on August 19, 1950, on the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota, and was buried in the St. Agnes Catholic Cemetery in Manderson. He was a member of Big Road’s Band and claimed two scalps during the Reno fight.

William L. Crawford died on August 20, 1876, of typhoid fever at Fort Abraham Lincoln in the Dakota Territory. He was originally buried in the Post Cemetery there and was later interred in the Custer National Cemetery on Crow Agency, Big Horn County, Montana. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Elwyn S. Reid died of heart failure at Fort D. A. Russell in Wyoming on August 20, 1895, and was buried there in what is now the Francis E. Warren Air Base Cemetery in Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

Frederick William Benteen (right) was born on August 24, 1834, in Petersburg, Virginia, the son of Theodore Charles and Caroline Hargrove Benteen. He was the Captain of Company H, commanding a battalion, on scouting duty and in the hilltop fight, during which he was wounded.

James Flanagan was born in Innis, County Clare, Ireland, on August 24, 1839. He was a Sergeant in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

James Calhoun (left) was born on August 24, 1845, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and married Maggie Custer on March 7, 1872. He was the First Lieutenant of Company C but commanded Company L during the battle. He was killed along with three brothers-in-law (George Custer, Tom Custer, and Boston Custer) and their nephew, Autie Reed.

Luther Rector Hare (right) was born in Noblesville, Indiana, on August 24, 1851, the son of Silas and Octavia Elizabeth Rector Hare. He was an 1874 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and served as the Second Lieutenant of Company K during the battle. He participated in both the valley and hilltop fights.

William August Marshall died on August 24, 1892, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus, Ohio. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Ludwick St. John was born in Columbia, Missouri, on March 3, 1848. He was a Private in Company C who was killed with Custer’s Column during the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He was buried in the mass grave on Last Stand Hill.

Thomas F. McLaughlin died on March 3, 1886, in Jamestown, North Dakota, and was buried in the Jamestown State Hospital Cemetery. He was a Sergeant in Company H who was wounded during the hilltop fight.

Henry Rinaldo Porter, M.D., (left) died at the Hotel Metropole in Agra, India, on March 3, 1903, and was buried in the Cantonment Cemetery there. A memorial monument for Dr. Porter sits next to his wife’s grave in Oberlin, Ohio. During the battle, Dr. Porter was the Acting Assistant Surgeon on Staff, and he participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

Thomas Henry French (right) was born on March 4, 1843, in Baltimore, Maryland. He was the Captain of Company M and commanded his men in the valley and hilltop fights.

John Charles Creighton , who was also known as Charles Chesterwood, was born in Massillon, Ohio, on March 4, 1850. He was a Private in Company K who was in the hilltop fight.

Patrick Corcoran died on March 4, 1822, at Barnes Hospital on the grounds of the Soldiers’ Home in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who was wounded in his right soldier during the hilltop fight.

Thomas Joseph Callan

Thomas Joseph Callan died in Yonkers, New York, on March 5, 1908, and was buried in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in East Orange, New Jersey. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions there. His obituary, which was printed in numerous newspapers across the country, stated a different reason for the award.

Thomas Patrick Downing was born on March 6, 1856, in Limerick, Ireland. He was a Private in Company I who was killed with Custer’s Column.

John Foley died at Barnes Hospital in Washington, D.C., on March 6, 1926, and was buried in the Soldier’s Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who participated in the hilltop fight.

James Calhoun (left) married Margaret Emma Custer on March 7, 1872. Maggie Custer lost her husband, three brothers (GeorgeTom, and Boston) and a nephew, Autie Reed, during the battle.

Edwin Philip Eckerson was born on March 8, 1850, in Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory. He was a Second Lieutenant in Company L who was enroute at the time of the battle, so he was not present.

Charles William Larned (right) was born in New York, New York, on March 9, 1850. He was an 1870 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point. He was a Second Lieutenant in Company F who was on detached service at the time of the battle.

Climbs the Bluff died on March 9, 1880, at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory, and was buried in the Indian Scout Cemetery. He was an Arikara Scout, but he was on detached service at the time of the battle.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Thomas Sherborne died on August 19, 1910, in Washington, D.C. He also was a Private in the band, which did not accompany the cavalry to the Little Bighorn.

Black Elk (left) died on August 19, 1950, on the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota, and was buried in the St. Agnes Catholic Cemetery in Manderson. He was a member of Big Road’s Band and claimed two scalps during the Reno fight.

William L. Crawford died on August 20, 1876, of typhoid fever at Fort Abraham Lincoln in the Dakota Territory. He was originally buried in the Post Cemetery there and was later interred in the Custer National Cemetery on Crow Agency, Big Horn County, Montana. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Elwyn S. Reid died of heart failure at Fort D. A. Russell in Wyoming on August 20, 1895, and was buried there in what is now the Francis E. Warren Air Base Cemetery in Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

Frederick William Benteen (left) was born on August 24, 1834, in Petersburg, Virginia, the son of Theodore Charles and Caroline Hargrove Benteen. He was the Captain of Company H, commanding a battalion, on scouting duty and in the hilltop fight, during which he was wounded.

James Flanagan was born in Innis, County Clare, Ireland, on August 24, 1839. He was a Sergeant in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

James Calhoun (right) was born on August 24, 1845, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and married Maggie Custer on March 7, 1872. He was the First Lieutenant of Company C but commanded Company L during the battle. He was killed along with three brothers-in-law (George Custer, Tom Custer, and Boston Custer) and their nephew, Autie Reed.

Luther Rector Hare (left) was born in Noblesville, Indiana, on August 24, 1851, the son of Silas and Octavia Elizabeth Rector Hare. He was an 1874 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and served as the Second Lieutenant of Company K during the battle. He participated in both the valley and hilltop fights.

William August Marshall died on August 24, 1892, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus, Ohio. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

John Ryan (right) was born in Newton, Massachusetts, on August 25, 1845. He was the First Sergeant for Company M who participated in both the valley and hilltop fights.

James C. Blair died on August 25, 1918, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to detached service. (Note: Men with Custer states his death date as April 25, 1918, with a burial and reinterment in the Pittsburgh area. A photograph of his gravestone has been requested in hopes it will resolve the issue.)


This Week in Little Bighorn History

Thomas Henry French (left) was born on March 4, 1843, in Baltimore, Maryland, and he died on March 27, 1882, at Planters House in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He was originally buried in the National Cemetery there but was later moved to Holy Rood Cemetery in Washington, D.C. He was the Captain of M Company who commanded his men in the valley and hilltop fights during the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

John Charles Creighton (right) was born in Massillon, Ohio, on March 4, 1850. He was a Private in Company K who was in the hilltop fight.

Thomas Joseph Callen died in Yonkers, New York, on March 5, 1908, and was buried in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in East Orange, New Jersey. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions there.

Thomas Patrick Downing
 was born on March 6, 1856, in Limerick, Ireland. He was a Private in Company I who was killed with Custer’s Column. He was buried in the mass grave on Last Stand Hill.

John Foley of Ireland died at Barnes Hospital in Washington, D.C., on March 6, 1926, and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who participated in the hilltop fight.

James Calhoun (left) married Margaret Emma Custer on March 7, 1872. He was the First Lieutenant of Company C who commanded Company L during the battle. Maggie Custer lost her husband, three brothers (GeorgeTom, and Boston) and a nephew (Autie Reed) in that battle.

Edwin Philip Eckerson was born on March 8, 1850, in Fort Vancouver, Washington. He was the Second Lieutenant of Company L, but he was not present at the battle because he was enroute.

Charles William Larned (right) was born in New York, New York, on March 9, 1850. He was an 1870 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point who was the Second Lieutenant in Company F. He was not present at the battle due to detached service.

James Boggs was born on March 10, 1846, in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He was a Private in Company H who was not present at the battle. He was discharged for medical reasons on May 15, 1876.

Morris H. Thompson was born in Waukegan, Illinois, on March 10, 1852. He was a Private in Company E who was not present during the battle due to detached service.


This Week in Little Bighorn History

William L. Crawford died on August 20, 1876, of typhoid fever at Fort Abraham Lincoln in the Dakota Territory. He was originally buried in the Post Cemetery there and was later interred in the Custer National Cemetery on Crow Agency, Big Horn County, Montana. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Elwyn S. Reid died of heart failure at Fort D. A. Russell in Wyoming on August 20, 1895, and was buried there in what is now the Francis E. Warren Air Base Cemetery in Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

Frederick William Benteen (left) was born on August 24, 1834, in Petersburg, Virginia, the son of Theodore Charles and Caroline Hargrove Benteen. He was the Captain of Company H, commanding a battalion, on scouting duty and in the hilltop fight, during which he was wounded.

James Flanagan was born in Innis, County Clare, Ireland, on August 24, 1839. He was a Sergeant in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

James Calhoun (right) was born on August 24, 1845, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and married Maggie Custer on March 7, 1872. He was the First Lieutenant of Company C but commanded Company L during the battle. He was killed along with three brothers-in-law (George Custer, Tom Custer, and Boston Custer) and their nephew, Autie Reed.

Luther Rector Hare (left) was born in Noblesville, Indiana, on August 24, 1851, the son of Silas and Octavia Elizabeth Rector Hare. He was an 1874 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and served as the Second Lieutenant of Company K during the battle. He participated in both the valley and hilltop fights.

William A. Marshall died on August 24, 1892, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus, Ohio. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

John Ryan (right) was born in Newton, Massachusetts, on August 25, 1845. He was the First Sergeant for Company M who participated in both the valley and hilltop fights.

James C. Blair died on August 25, 1918, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Charles Camillus DeRudio (left) was born in Belluno Venetia, Austria, on August 26, 1832. He was the First Lieutenant for Company E who participated in both the valley and hilltop fights.

Marion E. Horn was born on August 26, 1853, in Richmond, Indiana. He was a Private in Company I who was killed with Custer’s Column.

James Weeks died on Crow Agency, Montana, on August 26, 1877. He was a Private in Company M who participated in both the valley and hilltop fights.

 


This Week in Little Bighorn History

This week we honor two of the men who received the Medal of Honor as a result of their valiant efforts during the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Thomas Joseph Callen died in Yonkers, New York, on March 5, 1908, and was buried in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in East Orange, New Jersey. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions there.

Other Seventh Cavalry milestones this week include:

Thomas Patrick Downing was born on March 6, 1856, in Limerick, Ireland. He was a Private in Company I who was killed with Custer’s Column. He was buried in the mass grave on Last Stand Hill.

John Foley died at Barnes Hospital in Washington, D.C., on March 6, 1926, and was buried in the Soldier’s Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who participated in the hilltop fight.

James Calhoun married Margaret Emma Custer on March 7, 1872. Maggie Custer lost her husband, three brothers (George, Tom, and Boston) and a nephew, Autie Reed, during the battle.

Charles William Larned was born in New York, New York, on March 9, 1850. He was an 1870 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point who was on detached service at the time of the battle.

Morris H. Thompson was born in Waukegan, Illinois, on March 10, 1852. He was a Private in Company E who was not present during the battle due to detached service.

Charles A. Windolph, who was also known as Charles Wrangel, died on March 11, 1950, in Lead, South Dakota, and was buried in the Black Hills National Cemetery in Sturgis. He was the last white survivor of the battle. He was a Private in Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight, for which he was awarded the Purple Heart and the Medal of Honor.