Posts Tagged ‘Sager’

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Joseph Green Tilford (left) was born in Georgetown, Kentucky, on November 26, 1828. He was an 1851 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point who was a Major at the time of the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He was not present at the battle due to detached service.

William Ephraim Morris died in New York City on November 26, 1933, and was buried in the Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, New York. He was a Private in Company M who fought in the valley and hilltop fights and was wounded.

Hiram Wallace Sager was born on November 27, 1850, in Westport, New York. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight.

The Battle of the Washita was on November 27, 1868. See the books below for more about this infamous battle.

Morris H. Thompson died on November 27, 1911, in Cloverdale, California, and was buried in the Cloverdale Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company E who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

George B. Herendeen was born on November 28, 1846, in Parkman Township, Geauga County, Ohio. He was a civilian scout who participated in the battle in the timber and on the hilltop.

John R. Steinker committed suicide by poisoning on November 28, 1876, at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory, and was originally buried in the cemetery there. He was later reinterred at Custer National Cemetery on the Crow Agency, Montana. He was a Farrier with Company K who participated in the hilltop fight.

Henry Petring (left) was born in Germany on November 29, 1853. He was a Private in Company G who participated in the valley and hilltop fights, during which he was wounded in an eye and hip.

James Pym died on November 29, 1893, in Miles City, Montana. He was shot and killed by a man who was “visiting” Pym’s wife and was buried in the Custer County Cemetery in Miles City. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight where he was wounded in the right ankle.

John Noonan committed suicide on November 30, 1878, at Fort Abraham Lincoln in the Dakota Territory, and was originally buried in the cemetery there. He was later reinterred at Custer National Cemetery on the Crow Agency, Montana. He was a Corporal in Company L who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Thomas W. Coleman died in Sawtelle, California, on November 30, 1921, and was buried in the Los Angeles National Cemetery. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

William G. Abrams was born on December 1, 1840, in Baltimore, Maryland. He was a Private in Company L who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.


This Week in Little Bighorn History

William G. Hardy was born on December 20, 1849, on Staten Island, New York. He was a bugler for Company A and fought in both the valley and hilltop fights. He died on April 7, 1919, in San Francisco, California, and is buried in the San Francisco National Cemetery, The Presidio. See below for books and miniatures of buglers.

Other Seventh Cavalry anniversaries this week include:

  • Hiram Wallace Sager died in Spokane, Washington, on December 21, 1907. He was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight.
  • Luther Rector Hare died on December 22, 1929, in Washington, D.C, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
  • Johann Michael Vetter was born in Hessen, Germany, on December 23, 1853. He was killed during the battle.
  • Joseph Carroll died on December 23, 1904, in Danville, Illinois, and was buried in the National Cemetery there.
  • Martin Personeus died in Carlinsville, Illinois, on December 24, 1889. He was on detached service during the battle.
  • Giovanni Martini died on December 24, 1922, in Brooklyn, New York. He brought the famous “be quick” note to Benteen.
  • John James Carey died in Malone, Grays Harbor County, Washington, on December 24, 1929.
  • Thomas W. Coleman was born on December 25, 1849, in Troy, New York. He was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight.
  • Edwin B. Wight was born in Casco, Maine, on December 25, 1851. He was on detached service during the battle.
  • Thomas Wilford Harrison died on December 25, 1917, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was buried in Yeadon, Pennsylvania.


This Week in Little Bighorn History

Stephen Cowley died on November 21, 1886. He was a Private in Company D who was on detached service at Yellowstone Depot during the battle.

Stephen Cowley was born in Sligo County, Ireland, his father was Michael Cowley, a butcher. He married Bridget Agnes Moore on January 21, 1871 in County Mayo, Ireland. He immigrated in the Spring of 1871 to the United States and immediately registered in the United States Army for the Civil and Indian Wars. He served with General Custer in Company B which was assigned the responsibility of guarding the pack train. His service continued and he was discharged from the Cavalry on September 10, 1882 at Fort Totten, North Dakota. . . .

Stephen and Bridget had 5 children, one son, Ambrose died at 5 months, those who survived are James Joseph, Stephen Joseph, Michael Joseph and Sadie Mary. Stephen died in November 1886 at Larimore, Grand Forks County, North Dakota. He is buried in the Bellevue Cemetery there. [Findagrave.com]

Other Seventh Cavalry anniversaries this week include:

  • Alexander Bishop was born on November 22, 1853, in Brooklyn, New York.
  • George Gaffney died in Washington, D.C., on November 22, 1916.
  • Charles Braden was born on November 23, 1847, in Detroit.
  • William Slaper was born on November 23, 1854, in Cincinnati.
  • George Blunt died on November 23, 1905, at the Joyce Hotel in Baltimore.
  • Augustus DeVoto died on November 23, 1923, in Tacoma, Washington.
  • Charles A. Campbell died on November 25, 1920, in Bismarck, North Dakota.
  • Joseph Tilford was born in Georgetown, Kentucky, on November 26, 1828.
  • William Morris died in New York City on November 26, 1933.
  • Hiram Sager was born on November 27, 1850, in Westport, New York.
  • The Battle on the Washita was on November 27, 1868. See the books below for more about this infamous battle.