Posts Tagged ‘White Swan’

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Philipp Spinner died at Camp Douglas, Wisconsin, on August 12, 1895, and was buried in the Fort Sheridan Cemetery in Highwood, Illinois. He was a Private in Company B who participated in the valley and hilltop fights at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

White Swan (left) died on the Crow Agency in Montana on August 12, 1904, and was buried in the Custer National Cemetery there. He was an Indian Scout who participated in the valley and hilltop fights where he was wounded.

Thomas Hughes, who was also known as Charlie Hughes, died on August 12, 1911, in Nashville, Tennessee, and was buried in the Nashville National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight.

Roman Rutten (who was also known as Roman Ruttenauer, Rutler, Rullin, and Bolten) was born on August 13, 1846, in Baden, Germany. He was a Private in Company M who fought in the valley and hilltop fights. He was wounded on Reno Hill.

Morris Cain died in Colville, Washington, on August 13, 1906. He was a Private in Company M who fought in the valley and hilltop fights.

Thomas Carmody died of cancer on August 13, 1912, in New York City. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

Fred E. Allan, who was also known as Alfred Ernest Allen, was born in Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, England, on August 14, 1847. He was a Private in Company C who was killed while fighting with Custer’s column.

Charles H. Houghtaling died on August 14, 1881, at Fort Lewis, Colorado, and was originally buried in the Post Cemetery there. He was later reinterred at the Fort McPherson National Cemetery in Maxwell, Nebraska. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

James Hill was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on August 15, 1826 or 1833. He was the First Sergeant in Company B who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

Charles A. Windolph (left), who was also known as Charles Wrangel, married his second wife, Mathilda Lulow, on August 16, 1884, in Sturgis, Dakota Territory. He was a Private in Company H who suffered a wound during the hilltop fight for which he received the Purple Heart. He was also the recipient of the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions during the battle.

Edwin Philip Eckerson died on August 17, 1885, in Hays, Kansas, and was buried in the Mount Allen Cemetery there. He was a 2nd Lieutenant in Company L who was enroute to the battle on June 25 and 26, 1876.

Frederick Smith died on August 18, 1905. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Jacob Huff died in Tilton, Illinois on August 18, 1929, and was buried in the North Grove Cemetery in Celina, Ohio. He was a Private in the band, which did not accompany the cavalry to the battle.


Little Bighorn Timeline: The Evening of June 25, 1876

Based on John S. Gray’s tables in Custer’s Last Campaign: Mitch Boyer and the Little Bighorn Reconstructed unless noted otherwise. Several people commented on this timeline when it was originally published on LittleBighorn.info; those comments are in italics.

June 25, 1876

PM

5:00: Young Hawk (Ree), Forked Horn (Ree), Red Foolish Bear (Ree), and Half Yellow Face (Crow) arrived at Reno Hill after being trapped on the east bank. White Swan (Crow) and Goose (Ree) who had been wounded and trapped on the east bank arrived on Reno Hill. They met 2nd Lieutenant Charles Varnum and Major Marcus Reno (left).

5:02: The pack train met 2nd Lieutenant Luther Hare who had orders for the ammunition packs. Reno ordered Varnum to bury 2nd Lieutenant Benjamin Hodgson, but they were awaiting tools. 

5:05: Captain Thomas Weir and Company D departed Reno Hill in search of Lieutenant Colonel George Custer

5:10: Scout George Herendeen‘s party noticed that the heavy firing diminished, and they left with 12 troopers. 

5:10-12: Custer’s last heavy firing was heard on Reno Hill. 

5:12: 2nd Lieutenant Hare arrived on Reno Hill in advance of the ammunition mules. 

5:15: Reno dispatched 2nd Lieutenant Hare to the north after Weir with orders to contact Custer. 

5:19: Two ammunition mules arrived with tools. 

5:21: Varnum left to bury Hodgson. 

5:22.5: Captain Frederick Benteen (left) departed Reno Hill with Companies H, K, and M to join Weir. 

5:25: Captaini Thomas McDougall, Company B, and 1st Lieutenant Edward Mathey arrived with the packtrain. Weir’s Company D arrived at Weir Ridge and halted. Both Companies B and D saw that the Custer fight had ended. 

5:29: Herendeen’s party met Varnum’s burial party. 

5:30: The Ree horse herders left Reno Hill for the Powder River. The Ree rear guard left to join the Weir advance party. 

5:32: Herendeen’s party met the Ree rear guard on the Weir advance. 

5:32.5: Hare left Weir Ridge to report to Reno. 

5:35: George B. Herendeen, who had been left in the timber, arrived at Reno Hill. Benteen and Companies H, K, and M arrived at Weir Ridge and halted. All saw the Sioux coming to attack. 

5:35+: Herendeen interpreted for Half Yellow Face and Reno. 

5:40: Reno and his orderly left to join the Weir advance. 

5:42.5: Benteen and Company H left Weir Ridge to find Reno. Hare met and joined the Reno party. 

5:43: Varnum returned from his burial mission and joined Company A. 

5:47.5: Benteen and Company H met the Reno party and halted for 10 minutes during which time they conferred. Hare left the halt with Reno’s retreat order. The impedimenta left Reno Hill for the Weir advance. 

5:50: Hare arrived at Weir Ridge and joined Company K. Companies D, K, and M left Weir Ridge for Reno Hill. 

5:52.5: Companies A, B, G, and the pack train left to join the Weir advance. Reno, Benteen, and Company H left the halt for Reno Hill. 

5:55: The rear guard, chased by the Sioux, passed Reno Hill while heading for the Powder River. 

5:57.5: Reno, Benteen, and Company H met the impedimenta and ordered it back. 

6:00: Reno, Benteen, and Company H arrived at Reno Hill.

6:02.5: Companies D, M, A, B, G and the pack train arrived at Reno Hill.

6:10: 1st Lieutenant Edward Godfrey (left), Hare, and Company K, covering the retreat, arrived at Reno Hill and covered the rear.

6:17: The horse herders passed the lone tepee and slowed down.

6:43: The rear guard passed the lone tepee and slowed down.

7:47: The horse herders saw that the “sun touches hills.”

8:13: The rear guard was six miles beyond the lone tepee.

8:30?: The horse herders heard shots ahead and a pursuit behind them. They lost the trail. The rear guard experienced the final attack by the pursuing Sioux.

8:47: The rear guard passed the divide “before dark.”

9:00: The evening battle at Reno Hill ended at dark.

9:17: The horse herders halted to water, then crossed the divide “in dark.”

11:45: The rear guard passed the Rosebud (Busby).

To be continued. . . .

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Cornelius Cowley died on August 6, 1908, in Washington, D.C. He was a Private in Company A who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

Daniel Mahoney died at Barnes Hospital in Washington, D.C., on August 7, 1885, and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

Joseph H. Green was born on August 8, 1849, in Leitrim, Ireland. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

Edmund H. Burke was born in Manchester, England, on August 10, 1842. He was a Blacksmith for Company K who participated in the hilltop fight.

Edward Davern died on August 10, 1896, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery in nearby Virginia. He was a Private in Company F who served as an orderly for Major Reno. He participated in the valley and hilltop fights where he was wounded.

Philipp Spinner died at Camp Douglas, Wisconsin, on August 12, 1895, and was buried in the Fort Sheridan Cemetery in Highwood, Illinois. He was a Private in Company B who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

White Swan died on the Crow Agency in Montana on August 12, 1904, and was buried in the Custer National Cemetery there. He was an Indian Scout who participated in the valley and hilltop fights where he was wounded.

Thomas Hughes, who was also known as Charlie Hughes, died on August 12, 1911, in Nashville, Tennessee, and was buried in the Nashville National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight.