This Week in Little Bighorn History

William G. Abrams married Elizabeth Adelphine Smith Marine on November 6, 1881. He was a Private in Company L who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight during the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

John W. Burkman (left) committed suicide by gunshot in Billings, Montana, on November 6, 1925. He was buried in the Custer National Cemetery in Crow Agency, Montana. He was a Private with Company L who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

James J. Pym was born in Garsington, England, on November 7, 1847. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight, during which he was wounded in the right ankle. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the battle.

 Henry P. Jones, also known as John Bush, was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 1853. He served as a Private in Company I and participated in the pack train escort and the hilltop fight during the battle.

Crawford Selby (left) married Mary Elizabeth Beck on November 10, 1864, in Sturgis, Minnesota, and they were divorced on December 30, 1874. He was a Saddler with Company G when he was killed in the valley fight. Mary remarried in 1880.

Samuel James Foster died on November 10, 1883, near Manchester, Kentucky. He was a Private in Company A and participated in the valley and hilltop fights. He received a gunshot wound in his right arm during the retreat from the valley. He is said to be buried at the head of Arnett’s Fork on top of the mountain in Clay County, Kentucky.

Henry James Nowlan (left) died on November 10, 1898, in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and was buried in the Little Rock National Cemetery. He was the First Lieutenant on the Quartermaster staff and was not present at the battle due to detached service, serving as the Assistant Quartermaster for General Terry.

William H. Gilbert (right) was born on November 11, 1851, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a Corporal in Company L who was killed with Custer’s Column during the battle.

 Stanislas Roy (left) was born in France on November 12, 1846. He enlisted in the Seventh Cavalry in 1869 and served on both the Yellowstone and Black Hills expeditions. He later served as a corporal in Company A in the valley and hilltop fights at Little Bighorn. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the battle.

William Sadler died of diabetes on November 12, 1921, in Bismarck, North Dakota, and was buried the following day in the Linton Cemetery in Linton, North Dakota. He was a Private in Company. Despite what his obituary stated, he was at Powder River at the time of the battle and not with Reno’s command.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Crawford Selby (left) was born on June 5, 1845, in Ashland County, Ohio. He was a Saddler with Company G who was killed during the retreat from the valley fight during the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

Michael John Walsh was born in Ireland on June 6, 1852. He was a Private in Company H who was not present at the battle because he was under arrest in Louisiana following his desertion.

William M. Harris, a Medal of Honor recipient, died on June 6, 1885, in Berea, Madison County, Kentucky, during a gunfight. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight. He was buried in the Ballard/Jarman Cemetery in Bobtown, Madison County, Kentucky, and was later moved to the Camp Nelson National Cemetery in Nicholasville, Kentucky.

John James Carey was born on June 7, 1853, in Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight during the battle.

John Jordan Crittenden III (left) was born in Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky, on June 7, 1854. He was a Second Lieutenant with Company L who was killed with Custer’s Column.

Willis B. Wright was born on June 7, 1859, in Oskaloosa, Iowa. He was a Private with Company C who was killed with Custer’s Column.

Strikes the Bear (left) died in Ree, North Dakota, on June 7, 1929, and was buried as Red Star in the Indian Scout Cemetery in McLean County, North Dakota. His gravestone states his death date as May 12, 1929, but the June date appears to be the accepted date among researchers. He was an Arikara Scout who was with Reno’s Column when it crossed the river.

Bear Comes Out
 (Matokianapa), who was also known as Comes the Bear and Old Caddoo, died in a drunken brawl, according to Fred Girard, on June 8, 1878, at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory, and was buried in the Indian Scout Cemetery in McLean County, North Dakota. He was a Scout with Reno’s Column but did not cross the river.

Michael Crowe died at Fort Yates in the Dakota Territory on June 8, 1883, and was buried in Keokuk National Cemetery in Keokuk, Iowa. He was a Private in Company B who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight.

James W. Butler died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on June 8, 1924, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company F who was not present due to detached service. He was most likely in the hospital at Fort Abraham Lincoln, but he later claimed to have been guarding the wagon train at the Powder River camp.

Michael Christopher Caddle (left)was born on June 9, 1844, in New York City. He was a Sergeant in Company I who was not present at the battle due to detached service at Powder River, Montana.

Joseph C. Bates, who was also known as John or Joseph Murphy, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on June 10, 1838. He was a Private with Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights during the battle.

Elmer Babcock (left) was born on June 10, 1856, in Pharsalia, Chenango County, New York. He was a Private in Company L who was killed with Custer’s Column.

Samuel Davis Sturgis (right) was born in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, on June 11, 1822. Colonel Sturgis was an 1846 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point who was Commanding the 7th Regiment of Cavalry at the time of the battle but was on detached service in St. Louis, Missouri. Unfortunately, his son, Second Lieutenant James Garland Sturgis, was with Company E during the battle and was killed.

Edward D. Pigford (left) was born on June 11, 1856, in West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania. He was a Private in Company M who was wounded during the valley and hilltop fights.

William Heyn (right) died in Washington, D.C., on June 11, 1910, and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a First Sergeant in Company A who was wounded in his left knee during the valley and hilltop fights.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Stephen Cowley (left) was born on December 26, 1846, in Sligo, Ireland. He was a Private in Company D who was not present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn due to detached service at Powder River, Montana, guarding the wagon train.

Timothy Haley was born on December 26, 1846, in County Cork, Ireland. He was a Private in Company H who participated in the hilltop fight. See his death information below.

Max Hoehn (left) was born in Berlin, Germany, on December 26, 1854. He was a Private in Company L who stayed with the regimental papers at Powder River so he was not in the battle.

John Meyers died of consumption on December 26, 1877, at Fort Abraham Lincoln in the Dakota Territory and was buried in the Custer National Cemetery in Montana. He was the Saddler for Company C who participated in the hilltop fight. He was later wounded in 1877 during Gen. Miles’ fight with Chief Joseph.

John J. Fay and John Fox both died in Washington, D.C., on December 26, 1932. Fay and Fox both were buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. Both were Privates in Company D. Fay participated in the valley and hilltop fights, and Fox was in the hilltop fight.

Wilson McConnell died on December 27, 1906, in King, Wisconsin, and was buried in the Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who participated in the hilltop fight during the battle.

Peter Thompson (left) was born in Markinch, County Fife, Scotland, on December 28, 1843. He was Private in Company C who was wounded in the hilltop fight. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the battle.

John Samuel Ragsdale married Lois Durham on December 28, 1877. He was a Private in Company A who was not present at the battle due to detached service at Powder River, Montana.

Three of the men who served with the Seventh Cavalry in 1876 were killed during the Battle of Wounded Knee in South Dakota on December 29, 1890:

Richard Winick Corwine was a Private in Company A on detached service at Fort Abraham Lincoln during the battle. He was killed at Wounded Knee and buried in the Pine Ridge Cemetery, but he was reinterred in the Fort Riley Post Cemetery in September 1906.

Gustave Korn (left) was a Private in Company I and participated in the hilltop fight. He became the caretaker of Comanche, the only horse that survived the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He was killed at Wounded Knee and buried in Pine Ridge Cemetery, but he was reinterred in the Fort Riley Post Cemetery on December 17, 1892.

George Daniel Wallace (left) was a Second Lieutenant who commanded Company G during the battle and fought in the valley and hilltop fights. He died at Wounded Knee of bullet wounds to his head and abdomen and was buried on January 6, 1891, in Rose Hill Cemetery in Yorkville, South Carolina.

Frank Hunter died on December 27, 1899, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company F who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight during the battle.

Crawford Selby (left) and Mary Elizabeth Beck divorced on December 30, 1874, after ten years of marriage. He was a Saddler with Company G who was killed during the retreat from the valley fight.

William Jackson (right) died at Cutbank Creek on the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana on December 30, 1899, and was buried in St. Michael’s Cemetery in Browning, Montana.  He was a scout who participated in the valley fight.

David W. Lewis died on December 30, 1914, at the Government Hospital for the Insane in Washington, D.C., and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery at Section 17, Site 18504. He was a Private in Company B who was confined at Fort Barrancas, Florida, at the time of the battle.

William Henry Miller died in San Antonio, Texas, on December 30, 1914, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was the Blacksmith for Company E who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight.

William R. Oman was born on December 31, 1843, in Hamilton County, Indiana. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

Timothy Haley died on December 31, 1913, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company H who participated in the hilltop fight.

Happy New Year!

George Kelley was born on January 1, 1847, in New York, New York. He was a Private in Company H who was not present at the battle because he was detailed to General Terry’s column.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Henry P. Jones, also known as John Bush, was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 1853. He served as a Private in Company I and participated in the pack train escort and the hilltop fight during the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

Crawford Selby (left) married Mary Elizabeth Beck on November 10, 1864, in Sturgis, Minnesota, and they were divorced on December 30, 1874. He was a Saddler with Company G when he was killed in the valley fight at Little Bighorn. Mary remarried in 1880.

Samuel James Foster died on November 10, 1883, near Manchester, Kentucky. He was a Private in Company A and participated in the valley and hilltop fights. He received a gunshot wound in his right arm during the retreat from the valley. He is said to be buried at the head of Arnett’s Fork on top of the mountain in Clay County, Kentucky.

Henry James Nowlan (left) died on November 10, 1898, in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and was buried in the Little Rock National Cemetery. He was the First Lieutenant on the Quartermaster staff and was not present at the battle due to detached service, serving as the Assistant Quartermaster for General Terry.

William H. Gilbert (right) was born on November 11, 1851, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a Corporal in Company L who was killed with Custer’s Column during the battle.

 Stanislas Roy (left) was born in France on November 12, 1846. He enlisted in the Seventh Cavalry in 1869 and served on both the Yellowstone and Black Hills expeditions. He later served as a corporal in Company A in the valley and hilltop fights at Little Bighorn. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the battle.

William Sadler died of diabetes on November 12, 1921, in Bismarck, North Dakota, and was buried the following day in the Linton Cemetery in Linton, North Dakota. He was a Private in Company. Despite what his obituary stated, he was at Powder River at the time of the battle and not with Reno’s command.

Patrick Coakley (left) died at the Soldiers’ Home in Washington, D.C., on November 13, 1881, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to detached service as an orderly for General Terry.

Thomas H. Rush died on November 13, 1905, in Elmhurst, Alameda County, California. He was a Sergeant in Company D who was not present at the battle because he was hospitalized at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory.

William C. Slaper (left) died on November 13, 1931, in Sawtelle, California, and was buried in the Los Angeles National Cemetery. He was a Private in Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights. He attended the 50th Anniversary Reunion of the battle in 1926.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Note: New information is in bold.

May 30, 1876 – George Custer, Tom Custer, and Companies C, D, F & M scouted the Little Missouri River.

May 31 – This is Memorial Day in the United States when we commemorate American military personnel who died in all wars.

Henry Jackson was born on May 31, 1837, in Canterbury, England. He was a First Lieutenant in Company F who was not present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn due to detached service in Washington, D.C., at the Office of the Chief Signal Officer.

John J. “Jack” Mahoney (left) was born in Cork, Ireland, on May 31, 1845. He was a Private in Company C who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

Goes Ahead  (right) died at the Crow Agency in Montana on May 31, 1919, and was buried in the Custer National Cemetery there. He was a Scout who rode with Custer’s Column and participated in the hilltop fight.

Otto Emil Voit (left) died on June 1, 1906, in Louisville, Kentucky, and was buried in Saint Stephens Cemetery there. He was a saddler for Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. On December 29, 1890, he participated in the battle at Wounded Knee in Shannon, South Dakota.

John A. Bailey died in St. Paul, Minnesota, on June 2, 1915, in an elevator accident. He was buried in the Fort Snelling National Cemetery in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was a saddler for Company B who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

White Man Runs Him (left) died at Lodge Grass, Montana, on June 2, 1929, and was buried in Custer National Cemetery on the Crow Agency in Montana. He was a Scout who was with Custer’s Column and in the hilltop fight.

Charles Ramsey was a Private in Company I who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight. He deserted from Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory, on June 3, 1879.

Harry M. Krusee died on June 3, 1925, in Hot Springs, South Dakota, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company G who was not present at the battle due to detached service at the Powder River.

Black Calf (Hani-katil), who was also known as Boy Chief, died on June 4, 1922, in Armstrong, North Dakota. He was an Arikara Scout who was with Reno’s Column during the battle. He was buried with the name Boy Chief in the Indian Scout Cemetery in McLean County, North Dakota.

Christopher Pendle (left) died on June 4, 1923, in Gardenville, Washington, and was cremated. He was a Private in Company E who was not present at the battle due to his extra duty as a hospital attendant in the field.

Crawford Selby (right) was born on June 5, 1845, in Ashland County, Ohio. He was a Saddler with Company G who was killed during the retreat from the valley fight.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Wilson McConnell died on December 27, 1906, in King, Wisconsin, and was buried in the Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who participated in the hilltop fight during the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

Peter Thompson (left) was born in Markinch, County Fife, Scotland, on December 28, 1843. He was Private in Company C who was wounded in the hilltop fight. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the battle.

John Samuel Ragsdale married Lois Durham on December 28, 1877. He was a Private in Company A who was not present at the battle due to detached service at Powder River, Montana.

Three of the men who served with the Seventh Cavalry in 1876 were killed during the Battle of Wounded Knee in South Dakota on December 29, 1890:

Richard Winick Corwine was a Private in Company A on detached service at Fort Abraham Lincoln during the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He was killed at Wounded Knee and buried in the Pine Ridge Cemetery, but he was reinterred in the Fort Riley Post Cemetery in September 1906.

Gustave Korn (left) was a Private in Company I and participated in the hilltop fight. He became the caretaker of Comanche, the only horse that survived the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He was killed at Wounded Knee and buried in Pine Ridge Cemetery, but he was reinterred in the Fort Riley Post Cemetery on December 17, 1892.

George Daniel Wallace (right) was a Second Lieutenant who commanded Company G during the Battle of the Little Bighorn and fought in the valley and hilltop fights. He died at Wounded Knee of bullet wounds to his head and abdomen and was buried on January 6, 1891, in Rose Hill Cemetery in Yorkville, South Carolina.

Frank Hunter died on December 29, 1899, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company F who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight during the battle.

Crawford Selby and Mary Elizabeth Beck divorced on December 30, 1874, after ten years of marriage. He was a Saddler with Company G who was killed during the retreat from the valley fight.

William Jackson (left) died at Cutbank Creek on the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana on December 30, 1899, and was buried in St. Michael’s Cemetery in Browning, Montana.  He was a scout who participated in the valley fight.

David W. Lewis died on December 30, 1914, at the Government Hospital for the Insane in Washington, D.C., and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery at Section 17, Site 18504. He was a Private in Company B who was confined during the battle.

William Henry Miller died in San Antonio, Texas, on December 30, 1914, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was the Blacksmith for Company E who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight.

Timothy Haley died on December 31, 1913, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company H who participated in the hilltop fight.

Happy New Year!

George Kelley was born on January 1, 1847, in New York, New York. He was a Private in Company H who was not present at the battle because he was detailed to General Terry’s column.

Morris Cain married May Roberts in Miles City, Montana, on January 2, 1881. He was a Private in Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

Julius Gunther committed suicide on January 2, 1902, in Rock Island, Illinois, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to illness.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Henry P. Jones, also known as John Bush, was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 1853. He served as a Private in Company I and participated in the pack train escort and the hilltop fight at Little Bighorn.

Crawford Selby married Mary Elizabeth Beck on November 10, 1864, in Sturgis, Minnesota, and they were divorced on December 30, 1874. He was a Saddler with Company G when he was killed in the valley fight. Mary remarried in 1880.

Henry James Nowlan (left) died on November 10, 1898, in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and was buried in the Little Rock National Cemetery. He was the First Lieutenant on the Quartermaster staff and was not present at the battle due to detached service.

William H. Gilbert (right) was born on November 11, 1851, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a Corporal in Company L who was killed with Custer’s Column during the battle.

 Stanislas Roy (left) was born in France on November 12, 1846. He enlisted in the Seventh Cavalry in 1869 and served on both the Yellowstone and Black Hills expeditions. He later served as a corporal in Company A in the valley and hilltop fights at Little Bighorn.

William Sadler died of diabetes on November 12, 1921, in Linton, North Dakota, and was buried the following day in the Linton Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company D who was not present due to detached service at Powder River.

Patrick Coakley (left) died at the Soldiers’ Home in Washington, D.C., on November 13, 1881, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Thomas H. Rush died on November 13, 1905, in Elmhurst, Alameda County, California. He was a Sergeant in Company D who was not present at the battle because he was hospitalized at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory.

William C. Slaper (left) died on November 13, 1931, in Sawtelle, California, and was buried in the Los Angeles National Cemetery. He was a Private in Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights. He attended the 50th Anniversary Reunion of the battle in 1926.

Frederic Francis Girard (right) was born on November 14, 1829, in St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was an Interpreter on the Quartermaster staff who went missing during the valley fight on June 25, 1876. He rejoined the soldiers on Reno Hill on June 26.

Edward Rood (left) was born in Tioga County, New York, on November 14, 1847. He was a Private in Company E who was killed in the battle.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Henry Jackson was born on May 31, 1837, in Canterbury, England. He was a First Lieutenant in Company F who was not present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn due to detached service.

John J. “Jack” Mahoney (left) was born in Cork, Ireland, on May 31, 1845. He was a Private in Company C who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

Goes Ahead  (right) died at the Crow Agency in Montana on May 31, 1919, and was buried in the Custer National Cemetery there. He was a Scout who rode with Custer’s Column and participated in the hilltop fight.

Otto Emil Voit (left) died on June 1, 1906, in Louisville, Kentucky, and was buried in Saint Stephens Cemetery there. He was a saddler for Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions.

John A. Bailey died in St. Paul, Minnesota, on June 2, 1915, in an elevator accident. He was buried in the Fort Snelling National Cemetery in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was a saddler for Company B who was with the pack train and participated in the hilltop fight.

White Man Runs Him (left) died at Lodge Grass, Montana, on June 2, 1929, and was buried in Custer National Cemetery on the Crow Agency in Montana. He was a Scout who was with Custer’s Column and in the hilltop fight.

Charles Ramsey was a Private in Company I who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight. He deserted from Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory, on June 3, 1879.

Harry M. Krusee died on June 3, 1925, in Hot Springs, South Dakota, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company G who was not present at the battle due to detached service at the Powder River.

Black Calf (Hani-katil), who was also known as Boy Chief, died on June 4, 1922, in Armstrong, North Dakota. He was an Arikara Scout who was with Reno’s Column during the battle. He was buried with the name Boy Chief in the Indian Scout Cemetery in McLean County, North Dakota.

Christopher Pendle (left) died on June 4, 1923, in Gardenville, Washington, and was cremated. He was a Private in Company E who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Crawford Selby was born on June 5, 1845, in Ashland County, Ohio. He was a Saddler with Company G who was killed during the retreat from the valley fight.

Michael John Walsh was born in Ireland on June 6, 1852. He was a Private in Company H who was not present at the battle because he was under arrest in Louisiana following his desertion.

William M. Harris, a Medal of Honor recipient, died on June 6, 1885, in Berea, Madison County, Kentucky, during a gunfight. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight. He was buried in the Ballard/Jarman Cemetery in Bobtown, Madison County, Kentucky, and was later moved to the Camp Nelson National Cemetery in Nicholasville, Kentucky.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Three of the men who served with the Seventh Cavalry in 1876 were killed during the Battle of Wounded Knee in South Dakota on December 29, 1890:

Richard Winick Corwine was a Private in Company A on detached service during the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He was killed at Wounded Knee and buried in the Pine Ridge Cemetery, but he was reinterred in the Fort Riley Post Cemetery in September 1906.

Gustave Korn (left) was a Private in Company I and participated in the hilltop fight. He became the caretaker of Comanche, the only horse that survived the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He was killed at Wounded Knee and buried in Pine Ridge Cemetery, but he was reinterred in the Fort Riley Post Cemetery on December 17, 1892.

George Daniel Wallace (right) was a Second Lieutenant who commanded Company G during the Battle of the Little Bighorn and fought in the valley and hilltop fights. He died at Wounded Knee of bullet wounds to his head and abdomen and was buried on January 6, 1891, in Rose Hill Cemetery in Yorkville, South Carolina.

Frank Hunter died on December 29, 1899, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company F who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight during the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

Crawford Selby and Mary Elizabeth Beck divorced on December 30, 1874, after ten years of marriage. He was a Saddler with Company G who was killed during the retreat from the valley fight.

William Jackson (left) died at Cutbank Creek on the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana on December 30, 1899, and was buried in St. Michael’s Cemetery in Browning, Montana.  He was a scout who participated in the valley fight.

David W. Lewis died on December 30, 1914, at the Government Hospital for the Insane in Washington, D.C., and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery at Section 17, Site 18504. He was a Private in Company B who was confined during the battle.

William Henry Miller died in San Antonio, Texas, on December 30, 1914, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was the Blacksmith for Company E who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight.

Timothy Haley died on December 31, 1913, in Washington, D.C., and was buried there. He was a Private in Company H who participated in the hilltop fight.

Happy New Year!

George Kelley was born on January 1, 1847, in New York, New York. He was a Private in Company H who was not present at the battle due to being detailed to General Terry’s column.

Julius Gunther committed suicide on January 2, 1902, in Rock Island, Illinois, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to illness.

John Fox was born in Buffalo, New York, on January 3, 1844. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

Franklin Rankin, who was also known as Edward Clyde, was a Corporal in Company F who was not present at the battle due to detached service at Powder River. He died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to his head on January 3, 1895, at Columbus Barracks, Ohio, and was buried in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus.

Carl August Bruns was on detached service at the time of the battle. He died in Mandan, North Dakota, on January 4, 1910, and was buried in the Mandan Union Cemetery.

William M. Smith, a corporal in Company B, was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight where he was wounded. He died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on January 4, 1921.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Crawford Selby married Mary Elizabeth Beck on November 10, 1864, in Sturgis, Minnesota, and they were divorced on December 30, 1874. He was a Saddler with Company G when he was killed in the valley fight at Little Bighorn. Mary remarried in 1880.

Henry James Nowlan (left) died on November 10, 1898, in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and was buried in the Little Rock National Cemetery. He was the First Lieutenant on the Quartermaster staff and was not present at the battle due to detached service.

William H. Gilbert (right) was born on November 11, 1851, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a Corporal in Company L who was killed with Custer’s Column during the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

 Stanislas Roy was born in France on November 12, 1846. He enlisted in the Seventh Cavalry in 1869 and served on both the Yellowstone and Black Hills expeditions. He later served as a corporal in Company A in the valley and hilltop fights at Little Bighorn.

William Sadler died of diabetes on November 12, 1921, in Linton, North Dakota, and was buried the following day in the Linton Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company D who was not present due to detached service at Powder River.

Patrick Coakley (left) died at the Soldiers’ Home in Washington, D.C., on November 13, 1881, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company K who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Thomas H. Rush died on November 13, 1905, in Elmhurst, Alameda County, California. He was a Sergeant in Company D who was not present at the battle because he was hospitalized at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory.

William C. Slaper died on November 13, 1931, in Sawtelle, California, and was buried in the Los Angeles National Cemetery. He was a Private in Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights. He attended the 50th Anniversary Reunion of the battle in 1926.

Frederic Francis Girard (right) was born on November 14, 1829, in St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was an Interpreter on the Quartermaster staff who went missing during the valley fight on June 25, 1876. He rejoined the soldiers on Reno Hill on June 26.

Edward Rood (left) was born in Tioga County, New York, on November 14, 1847. He was a Private in Company E who was killed in the battle.

Marcus Albert Reno (right) was born on November 15, 1834, in Carrollton, Illinois. Entire books have been written about Major Reno because he played a significant and controversial role in the battle.

Frank Volkenstine, who was also known as Frank Bowers, was born on November 15, 1844, in Birmingham, Michigan. He was a Private with Company M, but he was not on the campaign because he was dishonorably discharged in Fort Wayne, Michigan, on May 31, 1876.

On November 15, 1877, Frederic Francis Girard married his second wife, Ella Scarborough Waddell. He had previously been married to a Piegan Indian.

Markus Weiss died on November 15, 1879, at Fort Meade in the Dakota Territory and was buried in the Fort Meade National Cemetery in Sturgis, South Dakota. He died of a compound fracture of his neck that resulted from a cave-in of a gravel bank. He was a Private in Company G who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

William David Nugent (left) died on November 15, 1934, in Coffeyville, Kansas, and was buried in the Parotte Cemetery in Cushing, Payne County, Oklahoma. He was a Private in Company A who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

James J. Galvan, who was also known as Michael J. Miller, was born in Liverpool, England, on November 16, 1848. He was a Private in Company L who was killed in the battle.

Hugh McGonigle died on November 16, 1916, in Washington, D.C., and was buried at the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company G who fought in the valley and hilltop fights.