This Week in Little Bighorn History

Black Wasichu or Black White Man (Wasicun Sapa), an Oglala Sioux, was wounded during the Custer fight and later died on June 27, 1876.

On June 28, 1876, Curley (Ashishishe) (left), a member of the Crow tribe, tried to tell Captain Marsh (right) about the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He was a Scout with Custer’s Column.

Thomas W. Stivers died in a gunfight on June 28, 1877, in Kingston, Kentucky, and was buried in the Richmond Cemetery in Richmond, Madison County, Kentucky. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for bringing water to the wounded during the battle.

John Hackett married Esther Smith on June 28, 1902. He was a Private in Company G who participated in the valley and hilltop fights. He was wounded in his left arm.

George Daniel Wallace (left) was born in York County, South Carolina, on June 29, 1849. He was a Second Lieutenant who commanded Company G during the valley and hilltop fights. He was killed at Wounded Knee on December 29, 1890.

William B. Crisfield (right) married Mary Pauline Blanchstone on June 29, 1865. They had three sons. He was a Private with Company L who was killed with Custer’s Column. Several months after his death, his wife married Martin Personeus who also was a Private in Company L but was not present at the battle due to detached service at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory.

The steamer Far West received 54 wounded soldiers from the Battle of the Little Bighorn on June 30, 1876.

Benjamin Hubert Hodgson

Benjamin Hubert Hodgson (left) was born on June 30, 1848, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a Second Lieutenant for Company B who was the Acting Adjutant for Reno’s Column. He was killed in the valley fight.

Conrad Farber married Jennie Jones on July 1, 1879. He was a private in Company I who was not present at the battle because he was serving as a carpenter in the quartermaster department barn in St. Paul, Minnesota.

George H. King died on July 2, 1876, in Pease Bottom, Montana Territory, where he was buried. In 1917, he was reinterred in the Custer National Cemetery on Crow Agency. He was a Corporal with Company A who participated in the valley and hilltop fights. He was wounded in the left shoulder on the evening of June 25 and was later evacuated to the steamer Far West where he died.

William W. Lasley (left) died on July 2, 1924, in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Private with Company K who participated in the hilltop fight.

John Eaton Tourtellotte (right) was born on July 3, 1833, in Windham, Connecticut. He was the Captain of Company G who was not present during the battle due to detached service as an aide-de-camp and colonel on the staff of Gen. Sherman. He had been assigned to the 7th Cavalry in 1870, but he never joined them.

William Montell George, a Private in Company K, died aboard the Far West on July 3, 1876, of wounds he received during the hilltop fight. He was buried the following day beside the Yellowstone River in Montana Territory. His grave was moved some time later to higher ground.

Peter Orlando Barry died on July 3, 1907, in Morgan, Maryland, and was buried in the Morgan Chapel United Methodist Church Cemetery in Woodbine, Carroll County, Maryland. He was a Private in Company B who was not present at the battle due to detached service with Terry’s headquarters.

Thomas Mower McDougall (left) died in Brandon, Vermont, on July 3, 1909, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. He was a Captain commanding Company B who was with the pack train and in the hilltop fight.

Michael John Walsh died on July 3, 1932, in Newark, New Jersey. He was a Private with Company H who was not present at the battle due to being confined after desertion.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Samuel Davis Sturgis (left) died on September 28, 1889, at St. Paul, Minnesota, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. He was the Colonel commanding the Regiment, but he was not present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn due to detached service at St. Louis, Missouri. His son, Lt. James Garland Sturgis, was killed with Custer’s Column.

Patrick C. White, who used the alias Patrick Connelly, died on September 28, 1909, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery there. He was a Sergeant with Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight.

Conrad Farber died in St. Louis, Missouri, on September 29, 1896. He was a Private in Company I who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

A number of men who survived the Battle of the Little Bighorn were killed fifteen months later on September 30, 1877, during the battle at Snake Creek, Montana.

James H. Alberts

David Edward Dawsey

Otto Durselew

Owen Hale

George M. McDermott

Max Mielke

Henry W. Raichel

William J. Randall

Francis Roth

William Whitlow

They were initially buried on the battlefield at Bear Paw Mountain but were later reinterred in the Custer National Cemetery on Crowe Agency, Montana.

James Montgomery Bell (left) was born on October 1, 1837, in Williamsburg, Blair County, Pennsylvania. He was the First Lieutenant for Company D who was not present at the battle because he was on leave.

Joseph Milton died in Tillsonburg, Ontario, Canada, on October 1, 1904. He was a Private in Company F who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Wilbur F. Blair died on October 2, 1891, in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, and was buried there in the Lewisburg Cemetery. He was a Private in Company A who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

Patrick Carey died in Washington, D.C., on October 3, 1893, and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Sergeant in Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Conrad Farber died in St. Louis, Missouri, on September 29, 1896. He was a Private in Company I who was not present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn due to detached service.

The Bismarck Tribune
October 24, 1877, p. 4

A number of men who survived the Battle of the Little Bighorn were killed fifteen months later on September 30, 1877, during the battle at Snake Creek, Montana.

They were initially buried on the battlefield at Bear Paw Mountain but were later reinterred in the Custer National Cemetery on Crowe Agency, Montana.

James Montgomery Bell (left) was born on October 1, 1837, in Williamsburg, Blair County, Pennsylvania. He was the First Lieutenant for Company D who was not present at the battle because he was on leave.

Joseph Milton died in Tillsonburg, Ontario, Canada, on October 1, 1904. He was a Private in Company F who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

Wilbur F. Blair died on October 2, 1891, in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, and was buried there in the Lewisburg Cemetery. He was a Private in Company A who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

Patrick Carey died in Washington, D.C., on October 3, 1893, and was buried in the Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery there. He was a Sergeant in Company M who participated in the valley and hilltop fights.

Frank Braun died on October 4, 1876, at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory, during an operation on the gunshot wounds he received during the battle. He was a Private in Company M who participated in the valley fight and was wounded in the face and left thigh during the fight on Reno Hill. He was originally buried at the Fort Abraham Lincoln Cemetery but was later reinterred in the Custer National Cemetery on Crow Agency, Montana.

Abram B. Brant (left) died at Camp J. D. Sturgis, Dakota Territory, on October 4, 1878, from a gunshot wound to the abdomen and was buried at Fort Meade National Cemetery. He was a Private in Company D who participated in the hilltop fight.

Henry M. Krusee, who was also known as Melanchton H. Crussy, was born on October 5, 1840, in New York City. He was a Private in Company G who was not present at the battle due to detached service at Powder River, Montana.

Abram Brant (above) was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for his actions on Reno Hill one day after his death. Six others were also awarded the Medal of Honor on October 5, 1878, for their actions during the battle:

Black Fox (left) died on October 5, 1936, and was buried in the Holy Family U. S. Scouts Cemetery in Sanish, Mountrail County, North Dakota. He was an Arikara Scout who was not present during the battle.

This Week in Little Bighorn History

Charles Henry Bischoff was born in Bremen, Germany, on September 23, 1855. He was a Private in Company C who was not present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn due to detached service.

Daniel NewellDaniel Newell (left) died of gangrene on September 23, 1933, at Hot Springs, South Dakota, and was buried in Bear Butte Cemetery in Sturgis, South Dakota. He was a Private in Company M who participated in the valley fight and was wounded in the hilltop fight.

Jahn Zametzer died at the U.S. Soldiers’ Home in Washington, D.C., on September 24, 1877, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company M who was not present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn due to illness.

John Robert Cooper died on September 24, 1903, in Harris, Iowa, and was buried in the Fairview Cemetery in Ocheyedan, Osceola County, Iowa. He was a Private in Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight.

George Hose died at Lake Nebagamon, Wisconsin, on September 24, 1924, and was buried in the Lake Nebagamon Cemetery there. He was a Corporal in Company K who participated in the hilltop fight.

Joseph K. Ricketts married Alice Williams on September 25, 1884, with whom he had a son named Bryan. Joseph was a Wagoner with Company M who was not present at the battle due to detached service at Powder River, Montana.

John E. Quinn died on September 26, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts. He was a Private in Company D who was not present at the battle due to detached service at the Powder River Depot.

Thomas Benton Weir (left)  was born in Nashville, Ohio, on September 28, 1838. He was the Captain in command of Company D during scouting and the hilltop fight.

Samuel Davis Sturgis (right) died on September 28, 1889, at St. Paul, Minnesota, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. He was the Colonel commanding the Regiment, but he was not present due to detached service at St. Louis, Missouri. His son, Lt. James Garland Sturgis, was killed with Custer’s Column.

Patrick Connelly died on September 28, 1909, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was a Sergeant with Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight.

Conrad Farber died in St. Louis, Missouri, on September 29, 1896. He was a Private in Company I who was not present at the battle due to detached service.


This Week in Little Bighorn History

Jahn Zametzer died at the U.S. Soldiers’ Home in Washington, D.C., on September 24, 1877, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. He was a Private in Company M who was not present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn due to illness.

John Robert Cooper died on September 24, 1903, in Harris, Iowa, and was buried in the Fairview Cemetery in Ocheyedan, Osceola County, Iowa. He was a Private in Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight.

George Hose died at Lake Nebagamon, Wisconsin, on September 24, 1924, and was buried in the Lake Nebagamon Cemetery there. He was a Corporal in Company K who participated in the hilltop fight.

Joseph K. Ricketts married Alice Williams on September 25, 1884, with whom he had a son named Bryan. Joseph was a Wagoner with Company M who was not present at the battle due to detached service at Powder River, Montana.

John E. Quinn died on September 26, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts. He was a Private in Company D who was not present at the battle due to detached service at the Powder River Depot.

Thomas Benton Weir was born in Nashville, Ohio, on September 28, 1838. He was the Captain in command of Company D during scouting and the hilltop fight.

Patrick Connelly died on September 28, 1909, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was a Sergeant with Company H who was wounded in the hilltop fight.

Conrad Farber died in St. Louis, Missouri, on September 29, 1896. He was a Private in Company I who was not present at the battle due to detached service.

James H. Alberts, David Edward Dawsey, Otto Durselew, and Owen Hale died on September 30, 1877, during the battle at Snake Creek, Montana. During the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Alberts and Dawsey were Privates in Company D and Durselew was a Private in Company A; all three participated in the hilltop fight. Hale was a Captain for Company K, but he was not present due to detached service.